Category Archives: horror

Las Brujas de Zugarramurdi/Witching & Bitching: masculinity and misogyny

I loved the first 20 minutes of this film. I loved its ironic and absurd humour, yet it turned quickly into a fudge with misogynistic undertones. The film puts gender relations at its core. Everything hinges on it: the characters, … Continue reading

Posted in fairytales, fantasy/supernatural, femininity, gender, horror, masculinity, power, ritual, sexuality, social conventions, society, witchcraft, Witching & Bitching/Las Brujas de Zugarramurdi | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

American Horror Story (Coven) 2 – Othering Voodoo, Race, & Rationality

As mentioned in my previous post on Coven, the series is set in a boarding school for witches in New Orleans, Louisiana. One of the witches is Queenie (Gabourey Sidibe), who is human voodoo doll. She can harm others by … Continue reading

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American Horror Story (Coven) – Witchcraft & the Dark Goddess

The Coven is the third installment of American Horror Story, the first being porn and film plagiarism, the second concentrating on the plagiarism. The third benefits from an injection of irony. It is set in a boarding school for witches … Continue reading

Posted in America, consciousness, Enlightenment, fantasy/supernatural, femininity, gender, horror, knowledge/epistemology, magic, nature, reality, reason/rationality, religion, ritual, The Coven (American Horror Story) | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sleepy Hollow – Science, Magic, and Modernity

Faithful to gothic tradition, Sleepy Hollow has fear at its centre. Fear is here understood as what cannot be controlled by scientific reason, but it also associated with the horror of the sublime, as argued by Edmund Burke. Tim Burton’s film … Continue reading

Posted in 'othering', belief, Enlightenment, fantasy/supernatural, gender, Godfrey Lienhardt, horror, knowledge/epistemology, magic, masculinity, Max Weber, myth, nature, reality, reason/rationality, religion, science, Sleepy Hollow (1999), Stanley Tambiah, witchcraft | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Trick ‘r Treat (part 2): Sacrifice, Rite of Passage, and ‘Othering’

The School Bus Massacre – Sacrifice and ‘Othering’  A group of children go from door to door trick ‘r treating but also collect jack-o’-lanterns. Alpha-girl Macy (Britt McKillip) tells the other kids of the ‘school bus massacre’. Thirty years prior, … Continue reading

Posted in 'othering', entertainment, fairytales, fantasy/supernatural, good & evil, Halloween, horror, Mary Douglas, myth, purity, ritual, sacrifice, society, tradition, Trick 'r Treat, vampires, Van Gennep, Victor Turner | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Trick ‘r Treat (part 1): Tradition and Ritual

The reason why I like horror is that it reverses the order of things. Those who fit society, be they conventional types or ‘alpha men and women’, are ridiculed, tortured, and killed. Horror is not just about our subconscious or … Continue reading

Posted in 'othering', entertainment, fairytales, fantasy/supernatural, good & evil, Halloween, horror, morality, myth, purity, ritual, tradition, Trick 'r Treat, Victor Turner | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cabin in the Woods – Sacrifice, Scientific Modernity, and the Entertainment Society

The films starts off with the all too common horror trope of college students setting off for a weekend in a cabin in the woods. The students seem at first corny stereotypes from a B-movie, but they are quickly shown to be … Continue reading

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The Babadook – the ‘horror’ of parenting and social conventions

(This was first published on Wales Art Review, available here) More than a horror, Babadook is a tale of a woman’s sense of inadequacy before society’s conventions and expectations. Australian director, Jennifer Kent, reinterprets F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922) to give … Continue reading

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Housebound – an ethnography of everyday misfits

Gerard Johnstone‘s Housebound is simply brilliant. It has action, horror and irony. Kylie (Morgana O’Reilly) confined to house arrest. She hates being back at home with her mother and behaves like an unruly teenager. At the first whiff of a ghost, … Continue reading

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Black Sheep – The Enlightenment Project & Nature

Black Sheep is a true classic! It  presents a critique of the Enlightenment project by exploring modern science, phobias, environmentalism, myth and monster sheep. Henry (the hero) develops a phobia of sheep due to a childhood trauma and leaves the family farm. … Continue reading

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